Critical thinking

  • Critical thinking

     Doctor Anna updated 1 month, 2 weeks ago 2 Members · 5 Posts
  • Doctor Anna

    Organizer
    March 3, 2021 at 11:13

    Karl Popper developed critical rationalism as a philosophy during the middle of the 20th century. Popper’s approach is based on the naturalistic idea that society has developed through a process of solving problems using trial and error. The natural and social sciences have been born out of such problem solving and progressed by subjecting potential theories to vigorous testing and criticism. Falsified theories are rejected. Popper calls for a society which is conducive to such problem solving, a society which permits bold theorizing followed by unfettered criticism, a society in which there is a genuine possibility of change in the light of criticism: an open society.

    Do we agree?

    Or do we lend towards teleological historicism, as espoused by Herbert Butterfield, an enquiry which attempts to construct a narrative view of history as a progressive march in one direction; towards an inevitable end point?

    Or neither?

  • Duncan Hill

    Member
    March 3, 2021 at 12:11

    Could it be both? Certainly when it comes to the natural sciences, the test is a test against an unchanging reality, meaning that the scientific process will ultimately lead to the same answer, even if say, we were to destroy all of our scientific knowledge and start from scratch.

  • Doctor Anna

    Organizer
    March 3, 2021 at 12:26

    Absolutely, having said that, there’s a few issues with historicism as a perspective I cannot get past, in that, human history is a single unique event, knowledge of the past therefore does not necessarily help one to know the future, the evolution of life on earth, or of human society, is a unique historical process… Its description, however, is not a law, but only a singular historical statement, study of history may reveal trends. However, there is no guarantee that these trends will continue, it stands to reason I think that Individual human action or reaction can never be predicted with certainty, therefore neither can the future, the human factor is ultimately the uncertain and wayward element in social life and in most social institutions, otherwise, I’m cool with historicism ?

    • Duncan Hill

      Member
      March 3, 2021 at 13:02

      Oh I definitely agree when it comes to human society and even a future course of events (the generalities of the death of the universe aside)

  • Doctor Anna

    Organizer
    March 3, 2021 at 13:04

    Apparently, we’re going to run out of oxygen in a billion years, so I’m thinking that nihilism may be the most congruent course of action ?

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